Lizzo Foundation garment Fabletics

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Lizzo Foundation garment Fabletics

Lizzo Foundation garment, Fabletics, Grammy-winning singer Lizzo is launching a shapewear line called Kitty. The form-fitting bodysuits and undergarments that makeup shapewear have become a lucrative business, with Spanx valued at $1.2 billion and Kim Kardashian’s Skims brand propelling her to the top of Forbes’ highest-paid celebrity list. Now, Grammy-winning singer Lizzo is launching her line of shapewear called Kitty, which she describes as couture but affordable.

What is shapewear?

The form-fitting bodysuits and undergarments that makeup shapewear have become a lucrative business, with Spanx valued at $1.2 billion and Kim Kardashian’s Skims brand propelling her to fame.

Kitty is shapewear designed by Grammy-winning artist Lizzo in collaboration with The Lizzo Foundation—the Seattle native’s charity aimed at helping people end poverty and violence through global collaboration. A portion of proceeds will go toward programs benefiting women of color who are survivors of sex trafficking.

Shapewear has been around for decades, but it’s only recently gained traction as a must-have item among celebrities and influencers alike. Many companies now offer their versions of shapewear: Spanx, Tezenis, and Yummie Tummie all sell their brands online; Victoria’s Secret has its version of shapewear; even Amazon sells its version (and yes, it does feature a best seller badge).

Shapewear is popular because it helps smooth out lumps and bumps while slimming down your silhouette. Here’s how they work: Underwear typically compresses fat tissue below skin level, while control tops use compression panels or strategically placed fabric over bulges like tummy rolls or love handles. To keep everything in place and avoid chafing, most garments include an inner lining made from cotton or nylon. Some also come with an outer layer made from nylon or polyester.

Shapewear For Every Body Type

There are two main categories of shapewear: bodysuits and undergarments. Bodysuits are tight, body-hugging single garments like Spanx (the granddaddy of all shapewear), while undergarments go on your whole lower half, including your thighs and butt.

Both types should be seamless so they don’t show through clothing. If you want to cover problem areas with smooth fabric—like an exposed tummy or cellulite on your legs—look for seamless shorts or leggings in either one piece or in sections (that way you can mix and match sizes). But generally, speaking?

Shapewear has a bad reputation for making women feel uncomfortable about their bodies. It’s important to remember that it’s not just about hiding flaws; it’s also about boosting confidence by creating a more streamlined silhouette. Shapewear can help accentuate what you do have going on, like curves or muscular arms, rather than drawing attention to what you’re trying to hide!

Lizzo Foundation garment Performance

The form-fitting bodysuits and undergarments that makeup shapewear have become a lucrative business, with Spanx valued at $1.2 billion and Kim Kardashian’s Skims brand propelling her net worth to over $100 million (and counting). Now Grammy-winning pop star Lizzo is jumping into that market with her bodywear range: Kitty.

The foundation garment will serve as an entry point for Lizzo’s lifestyle brand, allowing fans to slowly make their way toward other items—clothes included—as they build out their collections. While not officially part of it yet, there are plans to eventually bring in shoes and home goods.

Lizzo sees a lot of value in taking what she does on stage and bringing it off stage. With every outfit choice she makes on stage, Lizzo says she tries to be mindful of what she would wear if it were someone else performing. It was like: ‘How do I feel when I look at my butt? How do I feel when I look at my thighs?’ And you know what?

It wasn’t really about how I felt when I looked at my butt or thighs, says Lizzo. A fitting example of such mindfulness is found in Boys, one of Lizzo’s biggest hits. In addition to showcasing her flair for making a banger, Boys also serves as an ode to positive self-image through lyrics like: ‘This ain’t no fashion show/I don’t care about your Instagram.

‘ From album cover art featuring photos taken by female photographers and musicians wearing bras outside their shirts, Lizzo has been building up an image around being real, saying yes to what makes you happy even if it means being judged, and accepting yourself exactly as you are. This kind of positivity translates well beyond music; it shows itself throughout her brand from logo design to product selection.

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